Alvaro Obregon: Power and Revolution in Mexico, 1911-1920

Alvaro Obregon: Power and Revolution in Mexico, 1911-1920

Alvaro Obregon: Power and Revolution in Mexico, 1911-1920

Alvaro Obregon: Power and Revolution in Mexico, 1911-1920

Excerpt

The subject of revolution has intrigued historians, political scientists, and other social scientists for many years. Revolution as extreme social change, the rapid and violent change of elites and institutions, has offered in microcosm an opportunity to study individuals and societies going through transformations that ordinarily would take many more years. However, the focus of almost all of these studies has been concentrated on those forces which divide men and push them to violent action. Little consideration has been given to the process of recovery and reinstutionalization, the process by which peace between men is reestablished and goals, values, leadership, ways of dealing between men, and the political rules of the game in a given society are or are not changed.

Within the context of the Mexican Revolution, Alvaro Obregón stood out in the mythology as the organizer, the peacemaker, the unifier. The way in which he accomplished this reunification, however, has not been studied in any detail. How he did it, whether or not institutions would have been different had he not directed his efforts toward unification, whether the reestablishment of peace was inevitable or was a result of his efforts or of a combination of historical circumstances, what factors made it possible for him to rise to power in the first place, what the nature of his support was, and how this support influenced the subsequent emergent institutions of modern Mexico are questions that have scarcely been raised. Even the theoretical literature gives little help to those who . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.