The New Rationalism: The Development of a Constructive Realism upon the Basis of Modern Logic and Science, and through the Criticism of Opposed Philosophical Systems

The New Rationalism: The Development of a Constructive Realism upon the Basis of Modern Logic and Science, and through the Criticism of Opposed Philosophical Systems

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The New Rationalism: The Development of a Constructive Realism upon the Basis of Modern Logic and Science, and through the Criticism of Opposed Philosophical Systems

The New Rationalism: The Development of a Constructive Realism upon the Basis of Modern Logic and Science, and through the Criticism of Opposed Philosophical Systems

Read FREE!

Excerpt

As I send this manuscript to the publishers, I am keenly aware of how far the results that it presents fall abort of attaining that ideal both of method and of accomplishment which has been before me during the period of composition, and which I have explained in Chapters I. and III. Yet coincidentally with the closing of my labors I find that I am convinced more strongly than ever that, although there are many other ways, of undoubted value, in which to study philosophy, nevertheless the point of view and the method of treating problems which this book presents offer one way or mode of approach that has thus far been of much too infrequent use in philosophical investigation. For it has been my experience, especially during a number of years of teaching at Princeton University, as well as of presenting philosophical problems to the scientific workers of the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., that there is, at present at least, a much deeper interest in a systematic than in a historical treatment of philosophy. An opportunity to satisfy such an interest would be presented to a far greater extent than it now is, if only the effort were made in philosophy, as it is in science, not to emphasize history, but to investigate problems of fact, and finally to obtain such a fairly extensive body of knowledge as will receive general acceptance and be recognized as meaning a well- defined advance and progress.

The present tendency in philosophy, at least in our educational institutions, is, however, directly opposed to such a procedure, for it is to the almost exclusive study of the history of philosophy that both student and general reader are urged and directed. The result is that the average student of philosophy is left so perplexed through, e.g., the multiplicity of systems which his study discloses to him, that his dissatisfaction usually far exceeds his satisfaction with the outcome of his intellectual efforts. But even if this is not true of the student, it most . . .

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