Foundations for a Psychology of Education

Foundations for a Psychology of Education

Foundations for a Psychology of Education

Foundations for a Psychology of Education

Synopsis

The chapters in this collection illustrate how current concepts and principles from various disciplines can be viewed from the perspective of their value to educational process thinking. While not providing specific prescriptions for educational problems, the articles provide relevant experimental and theoretical knowledge has accumulated in many fields including learning theory, cognitive development, motivation, and intellectual abilities and attitudes.

Excerpt

The contributors to this volume provide richly informative and insightful views of the current state of knowledge in psychology and the study of cognition as it is relevant to understanding and improving the educational process. the authors of these chapters, some of the best scientists and scholars in their fields, review their disciplines with potential applicability to problems of education in mind. the fact that they agreed to do this represents a significant change in relationships between education and the disciplines that can contribute to it. It is still clear in our memories that 25 years ago the behavioral sciences and education were distant and reluctant relations. Despite the efforts of some outstanding pioneers, instructional practice and school learning were not salient concerns then in the work of scientists studying human behavior and cognition.

In recent years, social, professional, and scientific change have necessitated that these two worlds attend to each other more closely and recognize the value of each for the other. Educators interested in the contribution of modern advances to their profession have begun to unite knowledge of their subject matters with understanding of cognitive processes in learning, of the principles of human performance that underlie the design of teaching practices and materials, of variation in educational environments, and of attitudes and values that foster learning. They draw upon the knowledge of scientists who have taken on the educationally relevant areas of problem solving; motivation; the cognitive skills involved in reading, mathematics, and written communication; the structures of knowledge that facilitate reasoning and thinking; and the skills involved in self-learning and the ability to benefit from teaching and instruction.

The character of psychology has changed, partly because of this closer interaction. Until recently, the psychology that had been most useful to educa-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.