Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry: Concepts and Terms

Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry: Concepts and Terms

Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry: Concepts and Terms

Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry: Concepts and Terms

Synopsis

"This work should prove to be a joy and a delight to both novices and experts. Its depth of coverage within its topics places it well beyond more general works. . . . [Its] usefulness in the areas of history, literature, and the arts can justify its purchase by any library with patrons whose interests are set in the medieval period." RQ "Most historians find a work such as this valuable, but could bot have compiled it themselves; the fifteen years of research which produced this book would have reduced most of us to babbling, drooling, burnt-out cases, if not to catatonia. The effort and care which obviously went into this book evoke awe and admiration. . . . This work will be useful--perhaps even essential--to undergraduates writing papers in the area of knighthood and chivalry, as well as to historians wishing to confirm what they should already know. The Dictionary is particularly strong in matters military and heraldic. It is also fun for the browser; anyone who claims to have learned nothingfrom it is,either the author or a liar." Albion

Excerpt

This volume, on concepts and terms relevant to the world of the medieval knight, is the first of a two-part Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry; the second volume, now in preparation, will concentrate on persons, places, and events in history and literature. The intent of this first volume is to help the uninitiated reader more easily understand the development and growth of the intricate concepts of chivalry and knighthood in a world centuries removed from our own, concepts which hold incredible fascination for the modern reader and student perhaps because they are so far removed and different. Set up alphabetically to provide a brief explanation of the ideas, concepts, terms, and some of the major figures in the period between roughly 1050 and 1400, the period called "medieval," this work is intended primarily as a reference work. Practically all of the words or phrases included contain a reference to a major work on that subject. These references, which appear at the end of an entry as, for instance, "(Bibliog. 21)," are keyed to the alphabetical bibliography at the end of the book. When the text mentions a term or person on which additional information can be found in a separate entry, an asterisk indicates a crossreference to that entry. In addition, the appendix listing of entries by topic will aid those looking for information on a particular aspect of the subject. The listing of Feast and Saint's Days will provide a ready reference for those interested in the dates of these events.

In addition to serving as a reference work, the book should prove fascinating for someone who is merely curious about, for example, what money was circulated back then, how it was circulated, how much it was worth (see coinage), and other such questions. It explains what a medieval knight was expected to do, militarily, politically, and socially (see knighthood). It provides the type of information a knight was expected to know: weights and measures, conduct on the battlefield, arms and weapons, siege warfare, names and dates of feast days (see Appendix A) by which to date documents or events. It should also answer questions about a squire's training to become a knight, or about a castle or the crusades, or an ordeal, or the types of tournaments.

Further, it details social customs and mores of the period and provides descriptions of a coronation ritual, the precedence of royalty, and a definition . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.