Bernard Faey's the Two Franklins: Fathers of American Democracy

Bernard Faey's the Two Franklins: Fathers of American Democracy

Bernard Faey's the Two Franklins: Fathers of American Democracy

Bernard Faey's the Two Franklins: Fathers of American Democracy

Excerpt

A revolution is a change of mind. There have been few more radical changes of mind than the one which took place in America between 1790 and 1800.

But when historians describe the downfall of the Federalists and the victory of the new Democratic-Republican Party during these years they always speak in terms of Jefferson and Hamilton. They do not exhibit a change of mind. They merely stage a picturesque fight between two very great men, and two very attractive men.

I find these two men very attractive myself, and well worth presenting. But I cannot overlook the fact that they began by collaborating in revolutionary organization (1776- 1783, 1790-1793), and ended by coöperating even more closely. Jefferson would never have been elected President without Hamilton's final help.

So, in this study of the second American Revolution, I shall necessarily deal with these men; but I shall also deal, more especially, with the change of mind of the American nation and the leaders who influenced it.

As I see the matter, while Hamilton opposed this change and Jefferson made use of it, it was other men who effected this change of mind. I propose to deal mostly with these other men, and, above all, with the one of them who strikes me as the most outspoken, the most reckless, the most generous, and the most neglected. His name was Bache.

He may have been wrong. In any case, he died too soon . . .

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