A History of Communism in East Asia

A History of Communism in East Asia

A History of Communism in East Asia

A History of Communism in East Asia

Excerpt

To the peoples of the West, it is perhaps only natural that events in Europe should appear to be of considerably greater importance and concern than happenings in the distant parts of Asia. In some respects they may be right; but in these days of the Cold War it is as well to bear in mind that, ever since the Bolshevik seizure of power in Russia in 1917 made the implementation of Lenin's thesis on Imperialism a practical proposition, Asia has been a major factor in the struggle for World Revolution. Its importance as such was emphasized time and again by Leninhimself and by other outstanding Communist leaders in the early days of the Comintern, and Zinoviev's assertion that 'the road to World Revolution lies through the East rather than through the West' remains as firm an article of Communist faith today as it was when it was made in 1925. In the pages that follow, an attempt has therefore been made to indicate something of the background to Lenin's thesis and to trace the developments stemming from its application to the problems and circumstances of South and East Asia, an area which, for the purposes of this book, may be said to comprise roughly the Far East, South-East Asia, and the Indian sub-continent.

With this object in view, I have sought to outline the main developments in the rise of nationalism and in the spread of Communism in this area, to indicate how and why these developments came about, and to interpret Communist tactics and strategy in these strategically important and heavily populated regions in the light of world affairs in general and of Russian politics and policies in particular. For this last purpose it has been necessary to stray at times rather far from the purely Asiatic side of the picture; but without some reference to events in Russia and to those in the international field at large, the causes of Communist successes and set-backs in South and East Asia cannot be seen in their proper setting.

The book has been divided into four parts, each representing a specific phase. Part I therefore covers what may be called the formative period, from the second half of the nineteenth century, which saw the birth throes of nationalism, down to the early 1920's, when Communist parties first came into being in the countries of South and East Asia and Asia itself became a key factor in the cause . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.