Immigration: An American Dilemma

Immigration: An American Dilemma

Immigration: An American Dilemma

Immigration: An American Dilemma

Excerpt

What kind of immigration policy best suits the needs of the United States? For well over a hundred years the conditions under which immigrants should be admitted into the United States has been a hotly disputed subject. This issue has not only appeared repeatedly in the political sphere, as witness the Order of the Star Spangled Banner Party of 1850, but occasionally it has even led to rioting and mob violence. With each reappearance, at least until very recently, the problem has been dealt with by Americans as a strictly internal one; little or no attention has been given to the impact of our policies on foreign countries. But in the last few years this situation has radically changed. With its new responsibilities of world leadership since World War II, the United States has become acutely, though reluctantly, sensitive to world opinion. Consequently the regulation of immigration can no longer be treated as merely a domestic problem; it must now be developed in the knowledge that every step will be followed not only by the anxious eyes of our foreign friends but also under the critical scrutiny of our critics in other countries.

The whole problem of immigration as it today concerns the United States, as well as the rest of the world, has been well put by Kingsley Davis of Princeton University:

Demographically speaking the potential migration pent up in today's world is enormous. Not only is the earth's total population increasing at the fastest rate ever known, but the increase is extremely unequal as . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.