Public Colleges and Universities

Public Colleges and Universities

Public Colleges and Universities

Public Colleges and Universities

Excerpt

Public Colleges and Universities of the Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Institutions was initiated in October 1981 as a companion work to Private Colleges and Universities. Private Colleges and Universities was published in 1982 as a 1,619-page work detailing the histories and current status of 1,291 American baccalaureate and graduate degree-granting institutions. The two-volume work provided a unique contribution to the literature of American private higher educational institutions as the first historical compilation of its kind. Notes and Queries reported that it "would be heavily used in reference collections," and M. Kathy Cook suggested in the ARBA that the "historial background will . . . make this a valuable reference work." Public Colleges and Universities provides a similarly unique contribution for public institutions of higher education. The sketches are organized into two sections with the first providing information about the founding and historical development of an institution up to the 1980s. The second section provides a detailed description of the consequences of the historical development into the 1980s on institutional organization, academic programs, institutional services, and student activities.

Public Colleges and Universities consists of 578 sketches, including descriptions of 31 state systems and 547 public colleges and universities offering bachelor's and/or graduate degrees that are listed in the Education Directory, 1983 and Yearbook of Higher Education, 1982-83. Both directories list institutions that had been accredited or were candidates for accreditation by recognized regional or national accrediting agencies. The two lists are highly similar.

Letters requesting information were sent to the president of each institution. Many institutions responded positively to the request, a larger number simply did not answer, and a handful of letters were received stating that the institutions would not cooperate in providing information. Follow-up letters were first sent to public relations officers of institutions that had not responded and, in the event of continued lack of response, to reference librarians. In the case of a few institutions, unsatisfactory sketches were forwarded to the presidents with a . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.