The Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church

Synopsis

The first comprehensive introduction to the Orthodox Church in the United States from 1794 to the present, this text offers a succinct overview of the Church's distinctive history and its particular perspectives on the Christian faith. FitzGerald examines the relationship between the Orthodox Church and other Christian churches in the U.S., as well as the contributions the Orthodox Church has made to the ecumenical movement. This student edition, ideal for classes in American Religion, Denominational History, and American social and cultural history, includes a bibliographic essay intended as a guide for further investigation into aspects of Orthodox Christianity.

Excerpt

The Praeger series of denominational studies follows a distinguished precedent. These current volumes improve on earlier works by including more churches than before and by looking at all of them in a wider cultural context. The prototype for this series appeared almost a century ago. Between 1893 and 1897, twenty-four scholars collaborated in publishing thirteen volumes known popularly as the American Church History Series. These scholars found twenty religious groups to be worthy of separate treatment, either as major sections of a volume or as whole books in themselves. Scholars in this current series have found that outline to be unrealistic, with regional subgroups no longer warranting separate status and others having declined to marginality. Twenty organizations in the earlier series survive as nine in this collection, and two churches and an interdenominational bureau have been omitted. The old series also excluded some important churches of that time; others have gained great strength since then. So today, a new list of denominations, rectifying imbalance and recognizing modern significance, features many groups not included a century ago. The solid core of the old series remains in this new one, and in the present case a wider range of topics makes the study of denominational life in America more inclusive.

Some recent denominational histories have improved with greater attention to primary sources and more rigorous scholarly standards. But they have too frequently pursued themes for internal consumption alone. Volumes in the Praeger series strive to surmount such parochialism while remaining grounded in the specific materials of concrete ecclesiastical traditions. They avoid placing a single denomination above others in its distinctive truth claims, ethical norms, and liturgical patterns. Instead, they set the history of each church in the larger religious and social context that shaped the emergence of notable denominational features. In this way the authors in this series help us understand the . . .

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