Australian People and Animals in Today's Dreamtime: The Role of Comparative Psychology in the Management of Natural Resources

Australian People and Animals in Today's Dreamtime: The Role of Comparative Psychology in the Management of Natural Resources

Australian People and Animals in Today's Dreamtime: The Role of Comparative Psychology in the Management of Natural Resources

Australian People and Animals in Today's Dreamtime: The Role of Comparative Psychology in the Management of Natural Resources

Synopsis

This volume affirms how comparative psychology can help confront global environmental problems by analyzing and comparing the behaviors of humans and animals. This often complex relationship is clarified and given fresh insight as each paper in the collection examines some aspect of that relationship as it pertains to the ecological concerns of Australia. Data reported from aboriginal sources trace the development of the behaviors of many native species with a respect for indigenous people's knowledge and technology regarding their natural resources. The study's commitment to the renewal of environmental stability is far-reaching as it finds clues to the nature of a population's values and illustrates the need for diverse peoples to learn from each other in order to survive.

Excerpt

Some of the members of the International Society for Comparative Psychology have been examining how their expertise might be used to address the problems posed by the dangerous changes in the global environment and by the mismanagement of our natural resources, emphasising faunal resources. To implement this examination, the Society began to start each of its biennial conferences with a consideration of those issues as they pertain to the country in which the conference is taking place. the first such effort took place in Costa Rica in 1986. the second took place in Australia in 1988, and the present volume is the collection of papers presented at that biennial conference. We are grateful to David Croft and Sally McFadden for bringing together the authors who prepared the significant papers in this volume addressing this self-examination by the Society. the third such effort took place in 1990 in Barbados.

When we proposed such sessions to the cosponsors of the conferences, we were asked, as we had been asked frequently before, to explain why we think that global environmental problems are related to the study of the evolution and development of behaviour, or comparative psychology. More to the point, we are also asked in what way can comparative psychological studies . . .

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