Educational Policy and National Character: Africa, Japan, the United States, and the Soviet Union

Educational Policy and National Character: Africa, Japan, the United States, and the Soviet Union

Educational Policy and National Character: Africa, Japan, the United States, and the Soviet Union

Educational Policy and National Character: Africa, Japan, the United States, and the Soviet Union

Synopsis

This study is an integrated approach to how the problems of education are related to those of national development in Africa, Japan, the United States, and the former Soviet Union. Africa represents the Third World; Japan, the emerging powers; the United States, Western democracy; and the Soviet Union, the socialist world. The study is based on the assumption that a detailed study of these four countries will help to establish the relationship that exists between the problems of education and those of national development.

Excerpt

The purpose of this book is to take an integrated approach to a comparative study of the problems of education in Africa, Japan, the United States, and the former Soviet Union. the Soviet Union was selected to represent socialist systems, the United States to represent Western democracies, Africa to represent Third World nations, and Japan to represent emerging nations. the assumption is that a detailed study of these four will give the reader a clear picture of the problems of education in the world. the fact that as of January 1992, the Soviet Union no longer existed as a nation as it had since 1917 offers a unique opportunity to discuss the main characteristics of its education as a major component of its national character compared to the other three examples.

In this approach the book focuses on seven specific areas of critical importance. These are: the condition of education in the world at the conclusion of the Second World War in 1945; the importance of history; theoretical considerations; educational objectives and how their implementation determines the character of education and their effectiveness to serve national purpose; the curriculum; administrative structures; and current problems.

The approach

The study begins by examining some reasons why there has been a global crisis in education. This examination suggests reasons why, at the conclusion of the Second World War several nations made a concerted effort to collectively diagnose the causes of the outbreak of the war in 1939 and to set an agenda to avoid such conflict in the future. in this regard, the San Francisco conference, at which the un was inaugurated . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.