The American Pulp and Paper Industry, 1900-1940: Mill Survival, Firm Structure, and Industry Relocation

The American Pulp and Paper Industry, 1900-1940: Mill Survival, Firm Structure, and Industry Relocation

The American Pulp and Paper Industry, 1900-1940: Mill Survival, Firm Structure, and Industry Relocation

The American Pulp and Paper Industry, 1900-1940: Mill Survival, Firm Structure, and Industry Relocation

Synopsis

This book examines the U.S. pulp and paper industry between 1900-1940, the period when pulp and paper production relocated from the North to the South and the West. This relocation was one of the most influential shifts in industrial production in the 20th century, ranking second in extent of outmigration only to the exit of the cotton textile industry. This study focuses on the reason for the shift, with emphasis on the interrelationships among firm location, industrial structure, vertical integration, and firm survival and growth.

Excerpt

This book examines the U.S. pulp and paper industry between 1900 and 1940, the period of relocation of U.S. pulp and paper production from the North to the South and the West. In addition to the critical role of this relocation in the development of the paper industry, this was among the most influential shifts of industrial production of the twentieth century. In fact, the extent of outmigration of the pulp and paper industry from the Northeast ranks second only to the widely studied exit of the cotton textile industry that occurred in approximately the same period (Fuchs 1962, 22; Kane 1988). Industry relocation is of interest not only to economic historians and industrial economists, but also to students of economic geography, development economics, and regional economics.

Production from mills in the South and in the West grew from insignificant levels at the turn of the century to represent the majority of U.S. pulp and paper production after World War II. The reasons for this remarkable shift in production and the impact on the organization of the industry are the focus of this research. This study is an empirical investigation of pulp and paper firm behavior during the process of relocation, with an emphasis on the interrelationships among firm location, industrial structure, vertical integration, and firm survival and growth.

The primary data source is the annual Lockwood's Directory of the Paper and Allied Trades, which provides information about each pulp and paper mill operating in North America in this period. The directory data supply a complete geographic and size distribution of firms in the industry. By identifying individual mills, research based on the directories can . . .

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