Suppressed, Forced out and Fired: How Successful Women Lose Their Jobs

Suppressed, Forced out and Fired: How Successful Women Lose Their Jobs

Suppressed, Forced out and Fired: How Successful Women Lose Their Jobs

Suppressed, Forced out and Fired: How Successful Women Lose Their Jobs

Synopsis

So entrenched, long established, and powerful is the "patriarchy" within organizations that women have serious difficulty acquiring positions of real importance, even when it is in the organization's best interest to use their talents fully (and reward them equitably). Reeves surveys the structural obstacles to women's advancement within organizations and explains the mechanisms by which gender discrimination operates. Her book combines theory with case study accounts of 10 women who were suppressed, then fired, and documents how that sort of termination process works. The result is a fresh, new look at a seemingly intractable problem, presented readably and objectively.

Excerpt

Even in an age of equal opportunity legislation and workplace initiatives to make work more flexible and agreeable to women, women still occupy the lower rungs of the corporate ladder. Today's corporations spend a portion of their training budgets communicating employment law to managers, particularly laws concerning racial and sexual discrimination and how to prevent it, yet discrimination in the workplace continues. in spite of legal remedies in the United States (Title vii of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Pay Act of 1963) and in Britain (the Sex Discrimination Act of 1975 and the Equal Pay Act of 1970), inequities and power differences between men and women persist.

By examining the stories of ten middle and senior women managers, this book uncovers some of the mechanisms that make this entrenched discrimination possible. the women, after much investment in their careers, were forced out of their organizations. Through their experiences we come to understand how talented women are marginalized and eventually dismissed from organizations. As these women took exception to their treatment, their circumstances worsened. Their expressed concerns over equity were met with sexual harassment, bullying, and other forms of workplace intimidation. the women profiled in this book were employed in common fields such as human resources, finance, management consulting, marketing, engineering, and sales. They came from both the manufacturing and service sectors, representing companies in the financial services, retail, printing, aerospace, and food-processing areas. Having reached a level in their careers marked by a substantial amount of authority and responsibility, they . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.