Elites, Masses, and the Struggle for Democracy in Mexico: A Culturalist Approach

Elites, Masses, and the Struggle for Democracy in Mexico: A Culturalist Approach

Elites, Masses, and the Struggle for Democracy in Mexico: A Culturalist Approach

Elites, Masses, and the Struggle for Democracy in Mexico: A Culturalist Approach

Synopsis

In this book, a new general model of delayed transitions to democracy is proposed and used to analyze Mexico's transition to democracy. This model attempts to explain the slow, gradual dynamics of change characteristic of delayed transitions to democracy and is developed in a way that makes it generalizable to other regional contexts. Utilizing both qualitative and quantitative data based on an original data set of forty thousand individual interviews, Schatz analyzes how the historical authoritarian corporate shaping of interests and forms of political consciousness has fractured the social base of the democratic opposition and inhibited democratizing social action. Using comparative cases of delayed transitions to democracy, the author's conclusions challenge and improve upon current theories of democratization.

Excerpt

This book offers a sociological account of Mexico's "delayed transition to democracy" for the years 1991-97. Throughout, I will insert the study of Mexican democratization into the comparative sociological analysis of transitions to democracy.

Studies of democratization from non-Leninist civilian single-party authoritarian regimes like the Mexican, have received relatively little analytic attention. Many contemporary studies of democratization focus on the breakdown of military regimes in southern Europe and Latin America and on the transition to democracy and capitalism in Eastern Europe. Democratization in non-Leninist civilian single- party authoritarian regimes has received far less attention. This book seeks to fill this gap by examining the sociocultural sources of delay in Mexico's transition to democracy in the 1990s up to the historic 1997 election, in a comparative context.

Mexico's transition to democracy is clearly "delayed" when judged by macrosociological structuralist theories of economic development, given its level of urbanization, education and industrialization. This is compared with levels of development in already democratized nations. I argue that Mexico provides a prime case for theoretical development because its unusual characteristics provide the best opportunities to test, modify, and update the content of current theories regarding the social bases of democratization. To give a full account of Mexico's transition to democracy, I develop a new model of transitions that extends existing theories of the social bases of democratization.

I argue that the Mexican, and other transitions to democracy, from non-Leninist single-party systems in Asia and African, are best explained by a model of delayed transitions to democracy. Specifically, I explain the sociocultural sources of Mexico's transition to democracy in two ways. First, I argue that the Mexican state's . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.