The Selling of the Empire: British and French Imperialist Propaganda, 1890-1940

The Selling of the Empire: British and French Imperialist Propaganda, 1890-1940

The Selling of the Empire: British and French Imperialist Propaganda, 1890-1940

The Selling of the Empire: British and French Imperialist Propaganda, 1890-1940

Synopsis

This innovative volume explores the essential similarity of imperialist ideologies in Britain and France from 1890 to 1940. These nations attempted to sell the concept of empire to their respective peoples as a means of overcoming pressing internal problems. The author documents the development of imperialist ideology in both countries, analyzes its methods of propagation, and assesses its popular appeal. Beginning with the 1890s, when factions in both countries espoused a remarkably similar vision of empire, August traces the numerous manifestations of official ideology through the First World War and into the ensuing period of promised recovery and national regeneration.

Excerpt

The Selling of the Empire is a valuable contribution to several questions. It treats of a movement that, while never genuinely significant, was always interesting, especially in the years between the two World Wars: the movement for closer imperial union in Britain and in France. It moves across a rich range of imperial history in particular, and adds much to our knowledge about the intellectual and social background to popular and official imperial thought. and The Selling of the Empire, though focused on Britain, France and their colonies, provides a synoptic view that is equally appropriate to understanding any empire originating in a nation sufficiently democratic to believe it must justify its ways to its own people. Though the approach is somewhat different, Professor August's work is thus an analogue to John M. MacKenzie Propaganda and Empire: the Manipulation of British Public Opinion, 1880-1960 (Manchester, Eng., 1984).

Thomas August is interested in how opinion is shaped, and he brings no conspiracy thesis to his argument, for he recognizes that the conveyance of all information, including the act of teaching, is a form of persuasion, and thus of manipulation. He dispassionately examines a wide range of potential influences in favor of closer imperial union, from the cinema to books and lending libraries to expositions. Some subjects are, of course, pursued at greater length than others, and his book thus provides an agenda for future research as well as a fascinating and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.