Freedom for the College Student Press: Court Cases and Related Decisions Defining the Campus Fourth Estate Boundaries

Freedom for the College Student Press: Court Cases and Related Decisions Defining the Campus Fourth Estate Boundaries

Freedom for the College Student Press: Court Cases and Related Decisions Defining the Campus Fourth Estate Boundaries

Freedom for the College Student Press: Court Cases and Related Decisions Defining the Campus Fourth Estate Boundaries

Synopsis

"The leading academic authority on college press law provides a fascinating history of the treatment of college journalists and shows how legal precedents have evolved to protect their rights. Ingelhart explains the applicable legal distinction between journalism and private and public universities and does not confuse the subject by dealing with the quite different question of the rights of high school journalists.... The book should enjoy wide acceptance among those directly involved with college student publications, including undergraduates and community college studnets." - Choice

Excerpt

This book traces the short life of judicial support for freedom of the student press in public or state colleges. Judicial attention to this area began in the 1960s and has proceeded thereafter. In those twenty or fewer years, the courts of the nation have considered the college student press and have arrived at strong views in their decisions concerning the constitutional protection of that press for state colleges, but have been petitioned so little by the student press in private colleges that little judicial viewpoint has emerged.

The courts have varied their views about student publications in secondary schools since most students in such institutions are below the magic age of 18 established by the Twenty-sixth Amendment. This variable attitude makes it clearly necessary to separate court decisions between college and secondary school levels. Earlier studies, books, and articles which have intermingled the levels have created unnecessary confusion that has misled students, especially high school students who cannot be judicially as vigorous in exercising First Amendment rights as can college students.

This book attempts to look at, record, and at least partially analyze the court cases which have, directly and indirectly, touched aspects of college student publications in an important way. Surely not all such cases have been located or included, but certainly the percentage of inclusion is in the 90th percentile.

The author is indebted to the Student Press in America Archives, the Student Press Law Center, the Freedom of Information Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists, the College Media Advisers, Collegiate Hedlines, and approximately 400 respondents who have helped him with information and sleuthing over the years. The greatest help and encouragement, however, have come from thousands of student journalists who have observed and nurtured the growing understanding of this area of press law by listening to his reports and talks . . .

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