Facilitating Training Groups: A Guide to Leadership and Verbal Intervention Skills

Facilitating Training Groups: A Guide to Leadership and Verbal Intervention Skills

Facilitating Training Groups: A Guide to Leadership and Verbal Intervention Skills

Facilitating Training Groups: A Guide to Leadership and Verbal Intervention Skills

Synopsis

Most trainers rely on trial and error as the only means of improving facilitation skills. This definitive text furnishes a comprehensive framework for determining the best interventions to use in a given group situation. The trainer is presented with strategies for assisting the individual to establish an attainable goal, develop a strategy for change, and implement and evaluate that strategy during and following the life of the group. Both personal and professional development groups are addressed in the model. Clear descriptions of three primary models--t-groups, personal growth groups, and skills training groups--are provided.

Excerpt

Rapid expansion in the training field has led to the application of group models and techniques to a wide variety of organizational and educational settings. Methods of group work are being employed to enhance everything from managerial effectiveness, knowledge of group and organizational dynamics, leadership abilities and communication skills, to self-awareness and relationship skills. Even this list does not fully represent the applications of group work today.

The plethora of human relations training models has both positive and negative effects. On the positive side, the training field is in a creative period. Research on group dynamics, initiated by the pioneering work of Kurt Lewin, has generated great interest in the use of the group context to increase personal, interpersonal, and professional effectiveness. Also, providing growth-producing opportunities for functional people suggests a hopeful attitude toward increasing the degree of personal and professional satisfaction of the population at large. Finally, the provision of management and human relations training to many of the nation's workers suggests that, at last, U.S. business is beginning to take interpersonal skills as seriously as technical competence.

On the negative side, however, expansiveness has bred confusion, especially in reference to the specific aims, goals, and methods connected with such primary models as t-groups, skills training groups, and personal growth groups. Their names are often used interchangeably. In fact, trainers often mix and match techniques inappropriately. Resulting training designs may manifest this mixture and produce problems for groups and trainers in goal achievement, quality assurance, and consumer protection.

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