The Uses of Television in American Higher Education

The Uses of Television in American Higher Education

The Uses of Television in American Higher Education

The Uses of Television in American Higher Education

Synopsis

This comprehensive treatment in an historical framework examines the ways in which television extends postsecondary educational and training opportunities. The book focuses on the applications of technologies to relevant needs and problems, such as the ever-growing demand for continuing occupational/professional education and training. The study covers early successes and failures, the telecourse as a teaching method, new instructional uses of television, and the future of television use in higher education. Those involved in education, occupational training, and communications will find essential information in this book.

Excerpt

Some readers of this book may find it difficult to imagine a world without television. Television, nonetheless, has been with us only for a short time -- that is, short as historians reckon time. Yet some readers cannot remember a time when television was not part of daily life. For most Americans, it is now the primary source of their entertainment, provided conveniently in their own homes off the air waves or in videocassette recordings. For many, the TV set has displaced the daily newspaper as the source of information as to happenings around the world and in their own communities.

What is remarkable about the medium is its omnipresence. Sports fans sitting in arenas where the games are actually being played carry with them small TV sets and divide their attention between the TV screen and the live action. Shoppers in supermarkets watch videotapes demonstrating the care and preparation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Some shoppers are even deserting the malls and the stores, and are telephoning in orders as they see merchandise displayed on their TV sets at home.

However, television is not all entertainment or merchandising. Lawyers, accountants, nurses, and sales people gather in hotel meeting rooms or in hospital lounges and offices to watch television and brief themselves on recent changes in legislation and tax laws, or in new clinical and surgical procedures. Businessmen gather at local chambers of commerce to be updated by satellite on recent developments in Washington, D.C., concerning legislative issues relevant to their interests. Thus, it is easy to be infected by the enthusiasm of promoters and zealots and believe that . . .

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