For the Public Record: A Documentary History of the League of Women Voters

For the Public Record: A Documentary History of the League of Women Voters

For the Public Record: A Documentary History of the League of Women Voters

For the Public Record: A Documentary History of the League of Women Voters

Synopsis

Members of the League of Women Voters describe in their own words, the compelling story of political--but not partisan--women in 20th-century America. The skills and knowledge League women put to work on behalf of good government underscores the relevance and vitality of an informed and active citizenry.

Excerpt

Women won the vote with the enactment of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1919 and its subsequent ratification by thirty-six states in 1920. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, national leaders of the woman suffrage movement, anticipated that the Fifteenth Amendment enfranchising black men would also include "sex" in the language stipulating that "the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude." the exclusion of women angered Anthony and Stanton and prompted them to sever the close alliance previously enjoyed by abolitionists and suffragists. As they prepared to work on behalf of a sixteenth amendment enfranchising women in 1869, the two intrepid women organized the National Woman Suffrage Association. in that same year Lucy Stone and her husband, Henry Blackwell, formed the American Woman Suffrage Association. While the two associations shared a common goal, they differed in their tactics-a condition that would also characterize the suffrage movement in the early twentieth century as well as the women's movement from 1970 on.

Three other amendments (the income tax, the direct election of senators, and prohibition) would be adopted in the subsequent forty-three years, prompting suffragists to refrain from reference to a numerical identification. They chose instead to speak of a "federal" amendment (to distinguish it from state suffrage amendments). in the later years of the campaign, the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.