Literature and Insurgency: Ten Studies in Racial Evolution: Mark Twain, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Frank Norris, David Graham Phillips, Stewart Edward White, Winston Churchill, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Atherton, and Robert W. Chambers

Literature and Insurgency: Ten Studies in Racial Evolution: Mark Twain, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Frank Norris, David Graham Phillips, Stewart Edward White, Winston Churchill, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Atherton, and Robert W. Chambers

Literature and Insurgency: Ten Studies in Racial Evolution: Mark Twain, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Frank Norris, David Graham Phillips, Stewart Edward White, Winston Churchill, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Atherton, and Robert W. Chambers

Literature and Insurgency: Ten Studies in Racial Evolution: Mark Twain, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Frank Norris, David Graham Phillips, Stewart Edward White, Winston Churchill, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Atherton, and Robert W. Chambers

Excerpt

Criticism of literature per se is a lost art in America to-day. To-morrow or the day after it will come back as an exact science and part of a constructive insurgent revolt against machine-made and slipshod conditions in literature and in the life that literature interprets.

Any American criticism that is fit to survive or worthy of the name, must recognize that authors, editors, publishers, malefactors of great and lesser circulation and all their works, are to be classed essentially as products of environment and forces that react on the same, and so dealt with.

The fact that muck-raking has been made profitable and that our muck-raking magazines have proved their fitness to survive and to adapt themselves to American needs and ideals of to-day, represents the most important economic advance of the last fifty years.

Sooner or later in the present campaign of education, in the new reorganization and realignment of our mental and moral assets and liabilities, our present system of literary and journalistic production and distribution is due to come in for its full share of muck-raking and constructive criticism.

The series of articles on The American Newspaper by Will Irwin, published in Collier's Weekly during the summer of 1911, sufficiently foreshadows this tendency. A similar series of articles on The American Magazine by an author of equal reputation, in-

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