Planning for Serfdom: Legal Economic Discourse and Downtown Development

Planning for Serfdom: Legal Economic Discourse and Downtown Development

Planning for Serfdom: Legal Economic Discourse and Downtown Development

Planning for Serfdom: Legal Economic Discourse and Downtown Development

Excerpt

This book is the culmination of a prolonged study of ideology in law and economics and of the relationships that govern human interaction in the urban development context. In defense of liberty, human dignity, and freedom I have tried to set forth a theory of law, economics, and the state that will be of interest to the general reader, as well as to those engaged in the study of law, economics, and politics. My views and theory in this area have been generally influenced by the writings of Adam Smith, Friedrich Hayek, and Milton Friedman. While building on some of their general ideas, I have, nonetheless, tried to develop a theory or perspective independent of these earlier works. I do not purport to offer a theory that is merely a guess as to what each of these earlier scholars might think about the problems I address.

Much of this book consists of completely new material although there are portions that rely heavily on earlier publications and these sections have been updated and revised to fit in with the scheme of the book. In many places I have limited the note citation information related to these earlier publications. For readers interested in more detailed references, I suggest that they turn to the extensive footnote materials that correspond to my earlier articles.

The portions of the book that rely in substantial part on earlier publications are as follows: Chapter 3: Malloy, Invisible Hand or Sleight of Hand? Adam Smith, Richard Posner, and the Philosophy of Law and Economics, 36 KANSAS LAW REVIEW 209 (1988); Chapter 5 (in part): Malloy , The Political Economy of Co-Financing America's Urban Renaissance, 40 VANDERBILT LAW REVIEW 67 (1987); Chapter 8 (that portion dealing specifically with rent control): Malloy, The Economics of Rent Control -- A Texas Perspective, 17 TEXAS TECH LAW REVIEW 797 (1986), and Hoeflich and Malloy, he Shattered Dream of American Housing Policy -- The Need for Reform, 26 BOSTON COLLEGE LAW REVIEW 655 (1985); Chapter 9 (the later portion of "Classical Liberalism Compared"):

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