Psychoanalytic Theories of Affect

Psychoanalytic Theories of Affect

Psychoanalytic Theories of Affect

Psychoanalytic Theories of Affect

Synopsis

According to Stein, an updated and clinically-relevant affect theory is conspicuously absent in the field of psychoanalysis. This book represents the first attempt to collate and clarify psychoanalytic theories on affect as they relate to the clinical process. Stein outlines and analyzes the most important affect theories and empirical work presented in the last one hundred years. She exposes the rigidity of some automatically held notions about affects and draws on the newer ideas in the field to paint a large-scale picture of contemporary thought on the subject.

Excerpt

The role of affect is becoming increasingly important in psychoanalytic theory. Freud's theories of affect, in which affects were seen as derivatives of the instinctual drives, have proved to be inadequate, yet the different theories on the role and nature of affect put forward by psychoanalysis have proved equally unsatisfactory so far. the present book, which is based on a project carried out under my supervision, attempts to address the essence of these problems. Dr. Stein achieved the rare cum laude for her doctorate.

Ruth Stein has considered the history of psychoanalytic theories of affect and has undertaken a comparative study of these theories as they have appeared in the analytic literature. in my opinion, this book is by far the best review of the psychoanalytic theories of affect so far available. It includes a consideration of the work of British and French analysts, normally neglected by the significant writers in this area in the United States. It takes into account the work of such nonanalytic writers as Tomkins, Lazarus, and Mandler, and teases out the implicit theory of affect embedded in the writings of Melanie Klein and her followers. This review has enabled Dr. Stein to put forward a number of formulations in regard to the requirements for developing a suitable and appropriate psychoanalytic theory of affect. in doing this work, Dr. Stein has drawn on relevant work in adjacent areas of psychology.

Ruth Stein has a brilliant academic mind, which she has been applying in the psychoanalytic field for many years. She has been involved in the practice of psychoanalytic psychotherapy, as well as conducting supervised cases at the Israel Institute of Psychoanalysis over the past few years. She is also interested in the integration of the knowledge accumulated in experimental and cognitive psychology with psychoanalytic knowledge. She has an excellent background . . .

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