The Great Tradition: An Interpretation of American Literature since the Civil War

The Great Tradition: An Interpretation of American Literature since the Civil War

The Great Tradition: An Interpretation of American Literature since the Civil War

The Great Tradition: An Interpretation of American Literature since the Civil War

Excerpt

The principal change in this new edition has been the elimination of the last few pages of Chapter VIII and the introduction of a new chapter. It would have been pleasant if a complete textual revision had been possible, for there are many minor details that I should like to emend. On the other hand, I have no desire to alter the general critical method, nor do I feel inclined to modify in any fundamental way the evaluation of the various writers discussed. The first eight chapters, therefore, though there is room for clarification, expansion, or even slight qualification, represent with essential fidelity the views I hold today.

So far as the living authors are concerned, it happens that, though most of them have published books since this study was written, these recent publications serve rather to confirm than to alter the opinions expressed two and a half years ago. With the exception of Archibald MacLeish, whose Frescoes for Mr. Rockefeller's City contained more reactionary tendencies and whose Panic exhibited more revolutionary tendencies than had hitherto appeared in his poetry, there is no established writer who has published anything either strikingly different from or conspicuously better than the work herein discussed. Thornton Wilderhas, it is true, written his long-promised novel about contemporary life, but the ambiguity of Heaven's My Destination makes it impossible, even if one withdraws the charge of cowardice, to feel . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.