Delinquency in Three Cultures

Delinquency in Three Cultures

Delinquency in Three Cultures

Delinquency in Three Cultures

Excerpt

When the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health embarked upon a major program of research grants to scholars and scientists in 1955, an area of immediate concern was the lack of knowledge about social and cultural factors and their influence upon human behavior. Late that same year, the Third Interamerican Congress of Psychology was held in Austin, Texas, making it possible for a number of psychologists, psychiatrists, and related social scientists from Mexico City to meet for the first time with psychologists, anthropologists, and sociologists from The University of Texas. Common interests in cross-cultural research were quickly discovered, leading to a series of small international conferences and the launching of several research programs that are still continuing. One of the most significant collaborations to emerge from these exchanges involved Professor Carl Rosenquist, a sociologist with long-standing interests in criminology, and Professor Hector Solis Quiroga, a distinguished lawyer and sociologist from Mexico City. Although other pressing duties prevented Solis Quiroga from active involvement in their cross- cultural study of juvenile delinquency after the first two years, his contributions were sufficiently significant to ensure the success of the study in Monterrey as well as San Antonio.

Designing and conducting a cross-cultural investigation with the scope and complexity needed to provide definitive answers to important questions about delinquency and culture proved to be no small feat. With great patience and skill, Professor Rosenquist and his associates elicited the cooperation of schools, courts, reformato-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.