Highway Revenue and Expenditure Policy in the United States

Highway Revenue and Expenditure Policy in the United States

Highway Revenue and Expenditure Policy in the United States

Highway Revenue and Expenditure Policy in the United States

Excerpt

This book attempts to describe and analyze highway revenue and expenditure policies pursued by the federal, state, and local levels of government. Primary attention is focused on the disbursement problem, particularly at the state level. No effort has been made to delve into highway personnel or material specification practices, for although they admittedly bear a close relationship to the effectiveness of road construction and maintenance programs in a number of states, such considerations are secondary to the predominantly fiscal theme of this book.

My findings may be regarded as little more than an initial foray into largely unexplored territory. Much still needs to be done. It is hoped that this book, written primarily with the layman and the student of politics in mind, will spur others on to further investigations.

In the preparation of this work I relied heavily on the many studies conducted by state officials and various private organizations. The number and quality of these reports, unfortunately, varied from one state to the next. A few have published revealing and exhaustive analyses of their highway operations. Others have not bothered to make such surveys. This unevenness in sources of information has placed some states in a rather poor light. This is regrettable, but unavoidable. Therefore, caution should be exercised against drawing any blanket conclusions as to the extent of a state's highway financial and organizational deficiencies simply because it is unfavorably referred to several times. Some of the states not mentioned at all are reputed to rank down near the bottom of the highway fiscal and administrative scale.

For the purposes of this study, the newly created states of Alaska and Hawaii are treated as territories. Because the major portion of the book was written prior to their entry into the Union, I deal with only forty-eight states. To simplify matters, I rely exclusively on the term "state highway department" even though it is officially referred to as the "department of public . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.