Not the Law's Business?: An Examination of Homosexuality, Abortion, Prostitution, Narcotics, and Gambling in the United States

Not the Law's Business?: An Examination of Homosexuality, Abortion, Prostitution, Narcotics, and Gambling in the United States

Not the Law's Business?: An Examination of Homosexuality, Abortion, Prostitution, Narcotics, and Gambling in the United States

Not the Law's Business?: An Examination of Homosexuality, Abortion, Prostitution, Narcotics, and Gambling in the United States

Excerpt

This paper deals with the following kinds of behavior:

It deals with acts such as that of the teenager who sits in a theater balcony, quietly smoking a marihuana cigarette. And it deals with acts such as those of a group of young men and women at a "pot" party, giggling a good deal, passing a "joint" back and forth, getting "high," and making what they regard as extraordinarily incisive remarks about the contemporary condition of mankind.

This paper is also concerned with acts such as those of two men, both homosexuals, both in their early thirties, who come together in a "gay" bar, make cautious overtures, reach an agreement, and then go to the apartment of one or the other. In the apartment, by mutual consent, they engage in an act of oral copulation.

This paper is also interested in looking at the case of a 24-year-old woman, already mother of two children, now 5 weeks pregnant, who does not care to give birth to another child. She tries several folk remedies in an attempt to end her pregnancy, all without success. Then, acting on information from a friend, she arranges an appointment with an abortionist. The business is sordid. She arrives at a prearranged meeting place, is blindfolded and taken elsewhere, treated brusquely, and without dignity, and then returned to the rendezvous point. Afterwards, she may be somewhat ashamed, and in fear of a possible hemorrhage or other physical injury. But she is also likely to be very relieved that it is all done with.

This paper also deals with the second party to this transaction, the abortionist. The abortionist may be rather like the surgeon portrayed in a recent novel, who alleges that he turned to abortions because of the agony and feelings of impotence involved in operating on terminal cancer patients. "I started to do abortions," he says. "Nice and easy, everybody happy, like washing the dishes and leaving a clean sink.... I loved being an abortionist. I don't believe a 2-month fetus is a human being so no problems there. I was helping young girls and married women who were in trouble. I was making good money. I was out of the front lines. When I got caught I felt like a deserter that has been hauled in...." Or he may be . . .

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