Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance

Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance

Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance

Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance

Synopsis

This collection of essays surveys the diverse receptions and workings of Chaucer from the early 16th to the early 17th century. It emphasizes the many kinds of influence that Chaucer and his poems exerted on British letters and culture during these years and assesses how "Chaucer" -- poet, works, and representations by others -- became a cultural category that changed in Tudor and early Jacobean England, as the Reformation and increasing distance from Middle English made Chaucer representative of a lost medieval past.

Excerpt

The subject of this volume has dictated our using many different early editions (and editors and printers) of our writers: among modern editions, we rely on The Riverside Chaucer. For Spenser, we use either the Variorum edition, A. C. Hamilton edition of The Faerie Queene (Longman), or Smith andde Selincourt Oxford Poetical Works, depending upon the requirements of the particular chapter.

We're indebted to the many studies of Chaucer's roles in literary history and British culture, a phenomenon that's interested readers and writers since 1400. This endowment notwithstanding, there are still many paths to pursue within this field, on the way to the reciprocal engagement of traditional literary history with contemporary theoretical work. We hope that the chapters in this volume contribute to this project and spur others. I'm grateful to everyone who's supported this project: Notre Dame colleagues Dolores Warwick Frese, Graham Hammill, Katherine O'Brien O'Keeffe, Kathy Psomiades, Jennifer Warlick, Ewa Ziarek, Andrew Elfenbein; Ellen Martin, who helps me think through the possible relationships of early literatures and psychoanalysis; various audiences who heard earlier versions of some of these essays at conferences, especially at the Medieval Congresses in Kalamazoo, Michigan, the mmla in Minneapolis, and the conference of the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies; the anonymous readers for the press; Beth Ammerman, who provided much of the labor in compiling the bibliography; typists and computer aces Sherrie Reichold, Cheryl Reed, and Margaret Jasiewicz; the press's able editors -- Walda Metcalf, who began the project with us when it was hatched all too many years ago, and Meredith Morris-Babb, Judy Goffman, and freelance copyeditor Sally Antrobus. This book is made possible in part by support from the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, College of Arts and Letters, University of Notre Dame. Most immediately, I owe a happy debt to the contributors for their patience and their constant provocations to thinking, especially to Judith Anderson, who shared her editorial experience, and to all the members of my multi- species family for providing stability as well as constant drama -- especially my two good gray horses Pepper and (the late) Cruiser.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.