To Moscow--And Beyond: A Reporter's Narrative

To Moscow--And Beyond: A Reporter's Narrative

To Moscow--And Beyond: A Reporter's Narrative

To Moscow--And Beyond: A Reporter's Narrative

Excerpt

TEE MAY SUN splashed fire on the gold domes of the Kremlin churches just visible over the crumbling rose wall of the Kitai Gorod. Theater Square was bustling with Sunday traffic. From the open window of my Hotel Metropole room I caught the scent of purple lilacs in the pleasant park outside.

For five years I had not been in Russia. Now I was back in Moscow on a spring day so bright and warm that it was drawing all the inhabitants of the city out of their winter-sealed rooms. People sat on park benches or strolled lazily, letting the sun heat their blood and set it tingling again after the long Russian winter. As I stood at the window and watched the people surge in and out of the square, pushing up toward Manezhny Ploshad and on into Red Square, I thought it was time I went out and walked again in Moscow. It was time to join the ebb and flow of citizens on the wide, crowded sidewalks, to loiter around the wall boards and the stalls of the street vendors, to listen to the Russian voices and the Russian talk, to hear and see what the streets could tell me of the changes that had come to Russia and its people in the long period that I had been away.

Moscow . . . a transit town, Vasily called it. A city of people coming and going. Nowadays a million strangers passed through it every day. So it was said. That was not the Moscow I first knew. I first saw Moscow in the fading afternoon light of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.