Ancient Mycenae: the Capital City of Agamemnon

Ancient Mycenae: the Capital City of Agamemnon

Ancient Mycenae: the Capital City of Agamemnon

Ancient Mycenae: the Capital City of Agamemnon

Excerpt

The discovery of the new Grave Circle gave me the privilege of working at Mycenae, one of the renowned centers of the mythical world of Greece. For that privilege I am deeply grateful to the Council of the Greek Archaeological Society and to its secretary, Professor Anastasios Orlandos. I am also grateful to Dr. John Papademetriou, the ephor of the district, for his invitation to join him in this work. For three memorable summers, 1952, 1953, and 1954, we lived in the shadow of the Citadel of Agamemnon and collaborated in the task of unearthing the remains of the ancestors of the great king. Our exploration of the new shaft graves and the long discussions we had in the quiet of night, often with the magic Mycenaean full moon looking down on us from the top of Zara, will be remembered long and with affection.

When I was asked, in 1954, to give the Page-Barbour Lectures at the University of Virginia, I felt that Mycenae and her new shaft graves should be my subject. This book is based on these lectures, delivered at Charlottesville on March 29, 30, and 31, 1955. To the Page-Barbour Committee of the University of Virginia and to its chairman, Professor Edward Younger, I am grateful for their invitation and for the friendship and indeed Homeric hospitality which they extended to me during my stay in their fair city. To my friend of long standing, Professor A. D. Frazer, whose sudden death is mourned by classicists the world over, I am grateful for his many courtesies, for the reading of the manuscript, and for valuable suggestions.

It is a pleasure to acknowledge my indebtedness to the American Philosophical Society, the State Department, the Fulbright Committee, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation for grants which made it possible for me to return to Greece and take an active part in the work. To Washington University and its administration, and especially to Chancellors Arthur H. Compton and Ethan A. H. Shepley and to Deans Carl Tolman and Thomas S. Hall, I am grateful for their encouragement and interest in my work and for the leaves of absence granted me in 1951-1952, 1954, and 1955-1956. To the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton I am also indebted for my residence at the Institute, during which time I undertook the final revision of my text. Thanks are also due to Professor A. Or- landos . . .

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