The Reconstruction of Europe: Its Economic and Political Conditions, Their Relative Importance

The Reconstruction of Europe: Its Economic and Political Conditions, Their Relative Importance

The Reconstruction of Europe: Its Economic and Political Conditions, Their Relative Importance

The Reconstruction of Europe: Its Economic and Political Conditions, Their Relative Importance

Excerpt

I believe, that we are reaching the end of a chapter of European history which opened five years ago, in April, 1919, when the community of interest between the Allied and Associated Powers born of the War began to weaken. During these five years, Europe, left to herself, has endeavored to effect her own reconstruction with her own resources, if not always with her own ideas. She has not altogether succeeded, it is true, but on the other hand she has not entirely failed. Favorable partial solutions have been found, and today the spirit prevailing in Europe is more European than that of five years ago. At that time, each of the Allies and Associates aspired only to resume its entire independence of action: little by little, however, the idea has become general that real peace will be arrived at only through a conciliation of interests and a coöperation of willing effort. Britain is more willing to understand the financial needs of France, and France to understand the economic requirements of Britain; each having, for the last five years, faced its most pressing problems alone (France the rebuilding of her rains, Great Britain the support of her unemployed), both are now beginning to realize that, without a reconciliation of their respective policies, Europe will never be completely restored and will even lose the rank that history has given it. From Germany also come the lam-

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