The Diary of John Milward, Esq., Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, September, 1666 to May, 1668

The Diary of John Milward, Esq., Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, September, 1666 to May, 1668

The Diary of John Milward, Esq., Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, September, 1666 to May, 1668

The Diary of John Milward, Esq., Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, September, 1666 to May, 1668

Excerpt

I owe my first introduction to the Milward Diary to Mr E. S. de Beer. Had he undertaken the present edition all historians would have been grateful. As it is, however, he has no responsibility in the matter beyond his rather rash suggestion to me many years ago.

Miss Nancy Divine, of Hull, has helped me throughout in the transcription of the manuscript and in many vexatious and tiring tasks connected with the work. I owe her very much more than I can ever properly acknowledge.

My original intention in editing the Diary was to present it as nearly as possible in the form in which it has been preserved till now. The spelling, though full of inconsistencies, contains no difficulties, and the period is not without precedents for printed abbreviated forms. Such a transcript makes available for the reader the exact intentions of the author so far as we know them. On the advice of Mr Notestein, however, I abandoned this plan and myself decided that if I were to alter the manuscript forms at all I might as well attempt translation into modern nomenclature; and indeed, if anything at all is to be altered there seems to me little argument for retaining part of the original spelling. It is by no means easy to decide when MilwardMilward is abbreviating and when he is simply spelling eccentrically, and this I imagine to be true throughout the century. Here, then, I have attempted to impose consistency upon him, and have only preserved in the Index and Notes such variations as seem interesting. I thus hope to avoid offending those who are annoyed by any deviation from modern forms, and to placate those who like myself are interested in seventeenth-century pronunciation and spelling.

Post-Restoration English literature is as rich in domestic diaries as any period of our history. In Parliamentary diaries, however, it cannot compete with the years 1621-60. An interesting but at present inaccessible diary exists amongst the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.