The Making of Modern Uganda

The Making of Modern Uganda

The Making of Modern Uganda

The Making of Modern Uganda

Excerpt

The people of Uganda of all races have an unfailing interest in the history of their country and they are fortunate in possessing a fine collection of travellers' tales and memoirs from the period of exploration and missionary enterprise covering the latter part of the nineteenth century. What happened before the first explorers reached Uganda is, on the other hand, largely a matter of legend, while events since 1900 are so recent that historians have so far scarcely attempted to record them. This book is primarily an attempt to cover the history of the last sixty years since the declaration of the British Protectorate in 1894. To introduce these more recent developments there are two chapters, one on the tribal history of Uganda and one covering the period of the first European contacts with the country after 1862.

For my account of the period before 1862 I have had to rely largely upon the published works of anthropologists, upon recorded legends -- few in number -- and upon verbal accounts of past events given to me by elderly Africans who are proud to remember them and to hand them on. It is clear, however, that further work in this field will have to be done jointly by anthropologists, archeologists and historians, rather than by the unco-ordinated efforts of students of any one discipline. I have devoted only a relatively small amount of space to the eventful years between the arrival in Uganda of the first Christian missionaries and the mission of Sir Harry Johnston in 1899. This is not due to any underestimation of the importance of that period, but my main aim has been to trace the effects of British administration in Uganda.

I should like to record my sincere appreciation of the friendly assistance given by numerous officers of the Protectorate Government in the course of my work on this book. In particular I must thank Mr G. B. Cartland, CMG, Minister of Social Services, who urged me to write the book. Mr J. V. Wild, OBE, himself a keen historian whenever his official duties allow him time, has been kind enough to read my manuscript and to make the sort of judicial . . .

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