Biographical Dictionary of Marxism

Biographical Dictionary of Marxism

Biographical Dictionary of Marxism

Biographical Dictionary of Marxism

Synopsis

"Gorman has assembled a multidisciplinary and multinational team of academicians to produce this handy reference volume. Accompanied by the Biographical Dictionary of Neo-Marxism, also edited by Gorman, this work sketches the practitioners and theorists belonging to the orthodox, i.e., materialist, strain of Marxism. The more than 210 clearly written and concise entries range in length from a paragraph to Allen Wood's masterful nine-page essay on Marx. The activists and thinkers included hail from more than 50 countries; a useful appendix gives groupings by nationality. The Third World Marxists, whose main contributions are generally applications rather than theoretical innovation, are well represented. Besides basic biographical data, each profile provides a synopsis of the person's principal ideas and writings. Although not intended as a source for indepth research, the well-indexed biographies effectively identify these figures and situate them within the Marxist tradition. A brief bibliography lists primary and secondary materials for further study. College, university, and public library collections."- Choice

Excerpt

This volume contains biographical essays for over 210 Marxian philosophers and activists from almost fifty nations on five continents. Whereas the Biographical Dictionary of Neo-Marxism--also published by Greenwood Press--encompasses nontraditional philosophical variations of Marxian theory, this book focuses only on materialist or orthodox Marxism. Since most contemporary Marxists and Marxist parties are materialist, the problem of deciding who to include has been vexing. Two factors have particularly complicated the selection process. First, once materialist Marxism is established in the work of its seminal theorists, very little else of philosophical interest or significance is produced. And second, orthodox parties everywhere are represented by ideologues committed to rationalizing, justifying, and occasionally modifying Marxian theory to meet current national or regional conditions. Although these intellectual efforts may be interesting, they rarely transcend in significance the narrow geographical and temporal interests involved, and they are simply too numerous to all be included here. This dictionary will therefore concentrate almost equally on philosophy and strategy. Seeking to minimize the risk of redundancy, I have included only the major theoretical formulations of materialist Marxism as well as the significant and influential applications of materialism to concrete national conditions. One consequence is the extensive coverage given Third World Marxists, whose practical contributions have retooled materialist Marxism for the postcolonial liberation struggles in Africa, Asia, and Latin America--without, however, altering its philosophical base.

As in the Biographical Dictionary of Neo-Marxism, the final list of entrants herein has been formulated, debated, and ultimately approved by at least three indigenous scholars from each nation or region represented. I am certain that it is a fair and representative sampling of twentieth-century materialist Marxian thought and praxis.

In the introductions to both books I have tried to define carefully relevant terms and explain the criteria by which names are included and excluded. Nevertheless, some entrants rudely blur these distinctions. Where a nonmaterialist's impact on Marxist theory or praxis is noteworthy, or the editorial decision . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.