Frontier Politics on the Eve of the Civil War

Frontier Politics on the Eve of the Civil War

Frontier Politics on the Eve of the Civil War

Frontier Politics on the Eve of the Civil War

Excerpt

American historiography of the last half century has been characterized by a preoccupation with the American frontier. Ever since the publication of Frederick Jackson Turner's provocative essay in 1893, American historians have studied the frontier in an effort to explain American social and political behavior. In spite of this preoccupation, however, relatively little historical scholarship has been directed toward a study of American frontier politics and their relation to the national politics of the United States. Frontier political life did not operate in a vacuum but was closely linked at all times with national politics. The dynamic political energy of the nineteenth-century frontiers- man was in large part responsible for this identification, but the formal connection between local frontier politics and national politics was furnished by the national political organizations. Like the very life of the frontiersman himself, the principles of the national political parties were often altered or modified to meet unique frontier conditions. The expression of frontier political activity through the national party organizations often resulted in an odd and contradictory mixture of national and local issues. The experience of the Pacific Northwest frontier on the eve of the Civil War graphically illustrates not only the significance and character of . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.