The Wish to Be Free: Society, Psyche, and Value Change

The Wish to Be Free: Society, Psyche, and Value Change

The Wish to Be Free: Society, Psyche, and Value Change

The Wish to Be Free: Society, Psyche, and Value Change

Excerpt

Classical western concepts of freedom characteristically assumed that man has rational control over his faculties, that he can order his actions and effect calculated changes in his environment, and that he does so on the basis of self-interest. In this view, society comprises individuals with diverse interests and goals--goals that are personally chosen and best realized through mutual regard for the principle of competitive autonomy.

This was the ego-oriented view of man advanced by the liberal theorists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the view invoked to justify their demands for a broader inclusion of individuals in the decision-making processes of society. They insisted, in particular, that power be shared more equably in the political and economic areas of endeavor, for they believed these areas to be crucial to the real exercise of autonomy. And so that this diffusion of power . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.