Policing the European Union

Policing the European Union

Policing the European Union

Policing the European Union

Synopsis

International co-operation in criminal law enforcement has become an important policy issue for Europe in the 1990s. This book examines all of the major empirical and theoretical issues associated with the emerging pattern of co-operation, including the harmonization of criminal law and criminal procedures, law enforcement strategies, police organization and discipline, and the politics of immigration and civil liberties.

Excerpt

Clarendon Studies in Criminology, the successor to Cambridge Studies in Criminology, which was founded by Leon Radzinowicz and J.W.C. Turner more than fifty years ago, aims to provide a forum for outstanding work in criminology, criminal justice, penology and the wider field of deviant behaviour. It is edited under the auspices of three criminological centres: the Cambridge Institute of Criminology, the Mannheim Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice at the London School of Economics, and the Oxford Centre for Criminological Research.

Policing the European Union is the sixth volume to appear in this new series, and the second to deal with aspects of policing. It breaks new ground in a number of ways, most notably by approaching its subject matter from the perspective of political science. Economic and political co-operation between Member States of the European Union and the development of a 'border-less Europe' has naturally fueled fears that crime (especially organised crime) will spread across national boundaries and become increasingly immune to efforts of the police and other law enforcement agencies to control it. This is not only because countries are policed in different ways but also because each have, to some degree, their own definitions of crime and the 'crime problem', separate criminal laws and procedures, systems of criminal justice, and forms of political accountability. Professor Anderson and his colleagues thoroughly explore the ramifications of this diversity--conceptual, theoretical, political, administrative, and practical--for the development of an effective system of European police co-operation.

What makes their inquiry and discussion particularly valuable is that it is based on a wide range of sources drawn from many member states of the European Union: legal texts, parliamentary and governmental debates and inquiries, documents produced by the main organisations and pressure groups, newspapers and journals. All this is supplemented in a subtle way by insights gained from interviews with over a hundred senior officials from all States of the Union.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.