Labor Relations and Human Relations

Labor Relations and Human Relations

Labor Relations and Human Relations

Labor Relations and Human Relations

Excerpt

Any study of labor relations presented in this fall of 1947 appears in the long shadow cast upon the future by the uncertainties of the Taft-Hartley Act. For the law manifestly changes once more the general framework, so to speak, within which the still formative relationships between management and unions are developing in this country. The change presents itself, moreover, not as a gradual, mutually acceptable evolution of normal dealings between the parties, but as still another drastic transformation in the environment within which those dealings must now be adjusted.

Indeed, the opposition directed against the Labor-Management Act of 1947 by the unions recalls the deep resentments evoked among employers by the National Labor Relations Act only 12 years ago. The two laws belong together as related episodes in the chain of events that reveal labor relations in the United States still a crisis-conditioned, unformed institution, in which neither direction nor constitution can yet be charted. Depression, war, the upheaval of turbulent organizing campaigns, as well as the jolting impact of deepreaching legal reform all have played significant parts in the developments of the past decade. Against the background of the strong traditions of voluntarism in American labor relations the important influence of law upon these developments stands forth particularly impressive.

However different the origin and scope of the two laws that typify the new trend -- the Wagner and the Taft-Hartley Acts -- both project comparable consequences for human relations in industry. Each has evoked resentments, fears, and . . .

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