The Permanent Court of International Justice

The Permanent Court of International Justice

The Permanent Court of International Justice

The Permanent Court of International Justice

Excerpt

The Permanent Court of International Justice has now completed its twelfth year. In the course of this period, its constitutional law has been developed through the action of the Assembly and Council of the League of Nations and as a consequence of the action taken by various Governments, and the Court itself has laid the foundations of law and procedure upon which it will continue to build through the coming years. The time would seem to have arrived for comprehensive studies of the law of the Court for the assistance of lawyers who may appear before it and of others who must deal with its problems.

The present volume is designed to serve as such a study. The author has endeavored to follow the history of the Court since the creation of the Committee of Jurists which drafted its Statute in 1920. He has had exceptional opportunity for doing so, through connections from time to time with the Secretariat of the League of Nations and through the kindness of the Registrar of the Court. If the views here expressed should not commend themselves to the favor of the legal profession, they are based nevertheless upon a continuous study of the documents, upon numerous contacts with persons interested in the Court, and upon an unflagging interest in its activities.

The official publications of the Court are now very voluminous, as are also those of the League of Nations which relate to it. With respect to no other international institution and possibly with respect to no other public institution in the world is information available more adequately. Yet the very completeness of the documentation renders it sometimes difficult for one to answer a question which may arise, or to trace the development of a particular topic. It is not easy to thread one's way through the abundant literature concerning the Court; even with a large library at hand, a practitioner before the Court or a serious student of its problems may find difficulty in arriving at a conclusion concerning the precedents which have been established. So far as the author is aware, no book has heretofore . . .

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