Studies in Language and Literature

Studies in Language and Literature

Studies in Language and Literature

Studies in Language and Literature

Excerpt

Studies in Language and Literature is the contribution of Studies in Philology to the Sesquicentennial Celebration of the University of North Carolina. It appears as No. 3, Vol. XLII (1945) of Studies in Philology. The contributors are members of the graduate staff of the departments of language and literature here at the University. With few exceptions, the representation is complete. Notably, these exceptions are members of the University staff in war service: Professors George F. Horner, R. W. Linker, J. C. Lyons, Dougald MacMillan, Sterling A. Stoudemire, W. L. Wiley, and Dr. Albert Suskin. Though Professor Bond also is in this latter group, he was able to contribute.

The range of materials here included is explained by the fact that certain individuals were invited to contribute articles surveying briefly the fields of their interest or presenting some aspect of it, and by the fact that the other contributors were free to choose their subjects within the broad range of the general title -- Studies in Language and Lilerature. In the former category appear R. S. Boggs on folklore, Hardin Craig on Renaissance scholarship, Urban T. Holmes on comparative literature, Richard Jente on proverbs, George S. Lane on linguistics, S. E. Leavitt on trends in Latin American literature, Gregory Paine on American literature in 1789, and B. L. Ullman on trends in classical studies. The latter group ranges from the Hellenic alphabet and an interpretative essay on Sophoeles, to the dialect of Marietta Holley and "Reading and Understanding." The survey articles and the absence of members on war leave result in unavoidable gaps in special articles from fields of scholarship ably represented in the University.

It is especially fitting that Professor Dey, a member of the first Editorial Committee of Studies in Philology, should contribute the article on its history. As is the case with all such volumes, many of the contributors felt keenly the limitations of space. The necessary intent here is the note or brief article rather than the comprehensive study. In its totality the volume is presented as a cross section of some of the scholarly interests of the University departments of language and literature.

G. R. C.

Chapel Hill, N. C. July, 1945 . . .

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