Twentieth-Century Russian Literature

Twentieth-Century Russian Literature

Twentieth-Century Russian Literature

Twentieth-Century Russian Literature

Synopsis

This is the only volume in English that attempts to deal thoroughly with modern Russian literature- from Chekhov and Gorky to Solzhenitsyn and his contemporaries. Moore and Parry discuss the most significant phases of twentieth-century Russian literature- novels, dramas, poems, and films- but they also focus on all forms of communication, including newspapers printed by hidden presses and forbidden books by Russian and foreign authors. Everyone and everything of importance is illuminated in this comprehensive survey. Many writers are compellingly presented, and their lives and works viewed in the context of violent social and intellectual change.

Excerpt

No literature in the modern world has artistic, philosophical, or psychological ingredients or values alone. Inevitably it is also a sociopolitical expression, whether or not the prose writers and the poets in question consciously set out to articulate such thoughts and emotions.

For specific historical Russian reasons, this is particularly valid for Russian literature of all recent and current eras. As this was true of the great Golden Age of Russian literature in the nineteenth century, so it was in the Silver Age of the twentieth century up to the Revolution of 1917, and even more so in the Soviet period since the Communist takeover of the nation in that momentous year. At all times Russian literature is a mirror of its people's grievances, protests, and aspirations. What the tsars and the commissars have prohibited or curtailed on the political arena, what the police and the censors have denied to the people in its civil liberties, the people's bold and rare talents -- its writers and other artists -- have sought to voice, sometimes at great risks to their own personal freedom and even lives, through novels and short stories, through poems and stage plays and, latterly, through films.

But the effect often has also been the cause. The mirror has spoken up in magic and disturbing tones as a call to dissent and action. Itself a child of sociopolitical dreams and demands, Russian literature has ever been a mighty instrument and influence upon the societal fabric and the body politic of that gifted nation. In the nineteenth century . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.