The English Middle Classes

The English Middle Classes

The English Middle Classes

The English Middle Classes

Excerpt

We realize that some of the problems with which this book deals may seem remote and irrelevant to Americans--even to middle-class Americans. Indeed, middleclass Americans may find it hard to recognize, in the wide and heterogeneous strata of English society which we have tried to describe, their own counterpart with interests and problems similar to those with which they are familiar.

Very little of the English class structure was transported to North America with the Anglo-Saxon stock which originally colonized the territory, and in any case the class divisions of the British Isles have changed rapidly and significantly during the last 150 years. The English middle classes will probably seem, to Americans, to be cut off from the class below, and divided within themselves, to a degree unknown in the United States.

Nevertheless, we are convinced that the developments studied in this book are significantly related to the life of middleclass Americans. The English middle classes perform the same functions as their American counterparts: they provide most of their nation's brains, leadership, and organizing ability, and they are the main vehicle for the transmission of the essential national culture. Yet they are being squeezed economically, while being alternately wooed and lectured by left-wing politicians. Their incentives are being rapidly reduced, and their living standards progressively impaired, in the pursuit of an ideal of equality which seeks to relieve its . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.