The Old New England Academies Founded before 1826

The Old New England Academies Founded before 1826

The Old New England Academies Founded before 1826

The Old New England Academies Founded before 1826

Excerpt

In the period from the close of the Revolutionary War through the eighteen-twenties New England was not particularly rich. Her natural resources were small; manufacturing was barely started; farming gave sustenance but little profit; there remained fishing and shipping, her most lucrative means of livelihood, which were naturally confined to the coast towns. Yet that is the great period of the founding of the academies. How were these schools financed? Although both salaries and board were low, buildings had to be erected, and teachers paid, even at a minimum. How did they do it?

One of the most common ways of financing any public movement in the early days of the republic was by grants of land. This method was used on a large scale in Massachusetts and Maine by direct grants, and by Vermont in her County Grammar School lease lands. Occasionally, other states used it; for instance, New Hampshire granted a township in Coos County to be divided between Atkinson and Gilmanton Academies. Rhode Island had practically no public land. Connecticut's Western Reserve was earmarked for the common schools. (The land grants in Maine and Vermont will be discussed in the following chapters.)

A lottery was an accepted device for raising money in the early nineteenth century, and many academies used this . . .

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