Immigration and the Family: Research and Policy on U.S. Immigrants

Immigration and the Family: Research and Policy on U.S. Immigrants

Immigration and the Family: Research and Policy on U.S. Immigrants

Immigration and the Family: Research and Policy on U.S. Immigrants

Synopsis

This book documents the third in a series of annual symposia on family issues--the National Symposium on International Migration and Family Change: The Experience of U. S. Immigrants--held at Pennsylvania State University.

Although most existing literature on migration focuses solely on the origin, numbers, and economic success of migrants, this book examines how migration affects family relations and child development. By exploring the experiences of immigrant families, particularly as they relate to assimilation and adaptation processes, the text provides information that is central to a better understanding of the migrant experience and its affect on family outcomes.

Policymakers and academics alike will take interest in the questions this book addresses:

• Does the fact that migrant offspring get involved in U. S. culture more quickly than their parents jeopardize the parents' effectiveness in preventing the development of antisocial behavior?

• How does the change in culture and language affect the cognitive development of children and youth?

• Does exposure to patterns of family organizations, so prevalent in the United States (cohabitation, divorce, nonmarital childbearing), decrease the stability of immigrant families?

• Does the poverty facing many immigrant families lead to harsher and less supportive child-rearing practices?

• What familial and extra-familial conditions promote "resilience" in immigrant parents and their children?

• Does discrimination, coupled with the need for rapid adaption, create stress that erodes marital quality and the parent-child bond in immigrant families?

• What policies enhance or impede immigrant family links to U. S. institutions?

Excerpt

The number of first-generation, documented and undocumented immigrant individuals in the United States is 19.8 million, up 106% from 1970. Although much is known about their numbers and origin, very little is known about immigrant families even though their experience in the process of assimilation and adaptation is vital.

Several questions are central to understanding the migrant experience and family outcomes. Who migrates, and how does it affect family outcomes? How does the migration experience affect child and adolescent development? How do family structure and process change across succeeding generations? What policies enhance or impede immigrant family links to U.S. institutions? the chapters in this book address these questions and related issues. the chapters are based on the presentations and discussion from a national symposium on international migration and family change held at the Pennsylvania State University, November 2-3, 1995, as the third in a series of annual symposia focused on family issues.

Acknowledgments

There are many to thank for assistance with the symposium. We are indebted to the Pennsylvania State University Population Research Institute, Center for the Study of Child and Adolescent Development, Department of Sociology, Department of Psychology, Department of Human Development and . . .

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