Sir Christopher Wren

Sir Christopher Wren

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Sir Christopher Wren

Sir Christopher Wren

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The invective of moralists has expended itself in vain on checking Man's proneness to draw comparisons, a proneness which tends to mar the enjoyment of this by a lurking preference for that, a cynical delight in standing as Paris of old in the presence of Beauty, to allot the apple to this one or to that of its rival manifestations. The Arts especially, appealing as they do to the shifting surface as well as to the more enduring depths of the soul, are subject to comparison and contrast according as the moment's mood incline us to delight chiefly in the brilliance of pigment or to linger rather over those elusive curves which to seize is the art of the sculptor. Architecture differs from her sister arts most conspicuously in this, that, whereas pictures and statues are obvious beauty-snares, a building has almost invariably a purpose apart from the creating of æsthetic impression. It is raised for worship, for shelter; only the privileged may enter, and the crowd without, swayed now by envy, now by contempt, of those within, takes note rather of the impenetrability of the enclosure than of its proportions.

It is no doubt partly owing to this indifference of the crowd, the giving or grudging of glory having ever been . . .

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