The Negro from Africa to America

The Negro from Africa to America

The Negro from Africa to America

The Negro from Africa to America

Excerpt

This book had to be written, and I know of no one better fitted to do the work than Dr. Weatherford. The reader will soon realize the large amount of devoted labor that has been put into the task. Dr. Weatherford is one of a growing group of Southern white men who are intelligently active in showing white and colored people how many vital interests they have in common. He has been a pioneer in this group.

In this extensive study the author offers no final solution of the race problem, but he states "principles of procedure," based upon a careful survey of the life and progress of black men and women through years of struggle and handicap. He sets forth with clearness and force the philosophy of "doing the next thing," a philosophy which is so simple that impatient students of race relations have been unwilling to accept it. He presents well arranged excerpts from white and colored writers who have tried to create an intelligent public opinion in matters which relate to the Negro and his problems. He makes no attempt to gloss over the dark side of slavery, or the degrading influences of lynching, or the continued injustice which the Negro must frequently face.

This book is the presentation of the tremendously important human problem -- the problem of racial adjustment, which calls for wisdom, temperance, and the application of Christian principles to the affairs of everyday life, not only in America, but wherever the dark skin peoples of the earth are brought face to face with other peoples. The author makes a plea for social justice for all men and women. He presents evidence to show that the injustice which is inflicted upon a disadvantaged group will naturally be transferred to another group. He also makes a wholesome plea for the protection of Negro women, recognizing the fundamental importance of building up the Negro race by developing a wholesome family life.

Thoughtful white men and women are asking today as never before: "What is our duty toward the Negro?" Dr. Weatherford's answer is worth remembering: "It is my duty to do the next thing as I see it, and trust those who come after me to have as much wisdom, as much Christian spirit, and as much sense of justice as I have. . . . I must do my duty now and trust the results to God and future humanity." Action follows conviction . . .

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