Central America: Democracy, Development, and Change

Central America: Democracy, Development, and Change

Central America: Democracy, Development, and Change

Central America: Democracy, Development, and Change

Synopsis

Introduction by John M. Kirk and George W. Schuyler Part I: Democracy El Salvador: "Democratization" to Halt the Insurgency by Guillermo Manuel Ungo Democratization in El Salvador: Illusion or Reality? by Liisa L. North Democracy, Military Rule, and Agrarian Reform in Guatemala by Jim Handy Consolidating Democracy Under Fire by H.E. Sergio Lacayo Honduras: National Identity, Repression, and Popular Response by Judith A. Weiss Part II: Development Central America: Dependent-Welfare, Authoritarian, and Revolutionary Concepts of Development by James Petras and Morris H. Morley One Road to Democracy With Development: Jose Figueres and the Social Democratic Project After 1948 by Anthony Winson Resisting Conquest: Development and the Guatemalan Indian by W. George Lovell Developing Democratic Education in Central America Means Revolution: The Nicaraguan Case by W. Gordon West Militarization, U.S. Aid, and the Failure of Development in El Salvador by Charles Clements Part III: Change New Social Movements in Central America: Perspectives on Democratic Social Transformations by James Petras Liberation Theology as a Force for Change by Blase Bonpane The Sanctuary Movement in the United States by Mary Ann Lundy Four Themes and an Irony by Walter LaFeber The Reagan Administration and Its Attempts to Thwart Change Wayne S. Smith The U.S. War in Central America by Ed Asner Obstacles to the Peace Process in Central America by Sandor Halebsky and Susanne Jonas Appendix: Central America: Socio-Economic Statistics

Excerpt

Scholars and activists do not always mix easily, but in March 1987 they came together for a superb conference on Central America. This book reflects the dual nature of that conference -- an effort to inform and to identify paths of action. The organization and content of the conference gradually emerged from the sometimes conflicting perceptions of scholars and community activists about appropriate themes and priorities. We debated vigorously -- and sometimes bitterly -- but finally understood that we must work together for change in Central America.

First and foremost therefore, we are deeply grateful for the enormous contribution made by members of the Halifax-Dartmouth community. The Latin American Information Group, Save the Children Canada, Tools for Peace, and the Atlantic Chapter of the Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies stand out among the several groups that offered ideas, time, and expertise. Dozens of individuals helped in various ways but Eleanor O'Donnell, Beth Abbott, Pat Schuyler, and Sylvia Mattinson proved indispensable. Dalhousie University, Saint Mary's University and its International Education Centre, the Public Participation Program of the Canadian International Development Agency, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada contributed generously to the costs of the conference. Special acknowledgment should be given to Dr. Joseph Jabbra, Academic Vice President, Saint Mary's University, and to Dr. Robert Fournier, Vice President Research, Dalhousie University, for their support and advice. In preparing this volume, we are indebted to the sixteen contributors who responded promptly (and we hope, cheerfully) to our demands for material. Sylvia Mattinson worked long hours and with meticulous care . . .

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