Rural Process-Pattern Relationships: Nomadization, Sedentarization, and Settlement Fixation

Rural Process-Pattern Relationships: Nomadization, Sedentarization, and Settlement Fixation

Rural Process-Pattern Relationships: Nomadization, Sedentarization, and Settlement Fixation

Rural Process-Pattern Relationships: Nomadization, Sedentarization, and Settlement Fixation

Synopsis

This volume examines the relationships between rural settlement processes and the spatial patterns they produce by mapping past and present patterns and tracing historical processes generating them. Using the historical records of Palestine (Eretz Israel), Grossman reviews the settlement processes of bedouins (sedentarization and nomadization), Arab peasants (settlement fixation, migration, and frontier expansion of fallahin), and early Jewish settlers. This valuable work considers subjects central to both historical geography and rural geography, representing a unique approach of interest to a wide range of scholars.

Excerpt

This book is intended to fill a gap between rural studies of the modern period and studies that concentrate on historical aspects of rurality. This integrative design reflects my basic concern with attempting to illustrate how empirical findings can be applied to theoretical studies of rurality. This approach explains the heavy reliance on historical data, but it also necessitates the drawing of a great variety of material from a wide spectrum of social sciences -- geography and economics, sociology and anthropology. It is, therefore, a multidisciplinary study.

The book traces the relationships between processes and patterns of rural settlements in two geographical areas: Northern Europe, with a focus on Britain, and the Middle East, with a focus on Palestine (Eretz Israel). The latter section, containing seven of the book's eleven chapters, is the core of the study and is based on extensive field research conducted over several years. It deals with the existing patterns of settlement and their historical roots, as well as with the traditional and modern factors accounting for their creation. The results are presented in the tenth chapter of the book, bringing together in a single map the product of the three main processes: the Arab peasants (fallahin); the nomadic population (beduin); and the Jewish settlers.

The diverse processes represented by these three groups, which share a small territory of no more than 26,000 square kilometers, illustrate the complexity of the book's subject. The comparison with the British scene, to which two chapters are devoted, makes the task even harder. All parts of the book, however, focus on the initial phases of the settlement process, which provides them with a common theme, despite the diversity in historical time and geographical space. Thus, the discussion of the . . .

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