Games and Great Ideas: A Guide for Elementary School Physical Educators and Classroom Teachers

Games and Great Ideas: A Guide for Elementary School Physical Educators and Classroom Teachers

Games and Great Ideas: A Guide for Elementary School Physical Educators and Classroom Teachers

Games and Great Ideas: A Guide for Elementary School Physical Educators and Classroom Teachers

Synopsis

An innovative guide for physical education teachers from preschool through eighth grade. Topics include theoretical considerations for teaching games, an interdisciplinary approach to games, games of different cultures, increasing developmentally appropriate behavior through games, and innovative game activities which increase fitness and leisure pursuits. Each topic is illustrated, and sample activities and implementation strategies are provided.

Excerpt

The elementary school physical educator and the classroom teacher of today are very fortunate to be able to choose from any number of excellent references containing games and sport activities for all age levels. One could even conclude that the abundance of game literature makes it unnecessary to add one more title to the list. However, the decision to develop this resource seemed very logical. It was based on the fact that on any given day, at any given time, and in any given country in the world, elementary school age children organize themselves for the purpose of playing a favorite game.

These children may meet in community centers, local parks, open fields, sandlots, on one child's back or front lawn, and even on abandoned streets and sidewalks. They sometimes bring balls in a variety of sizes, shapes, and materials. Several will clutch striking implements like rackets, paddles, or softball bats, or they may agree to play chase and flee activities that do not require equipment. Individuals within the group will vary in age, height, weight, hair color, racial background, physical skill, and previous experience at game play.

Choosing which game to play will most likely become a point of discussion. Recalling previous game encounters, some children will urge their friends to consider new approaches or strategies aimed at increasing the group's success (Part I). Others will suggest that the group choose a game that incorporates new roles, story themes, or concepts learned in the classroom for an inventive experience (Part II). Still others will propose a game frequently played by their neighbors or family members who have lived in foreign countries (Part III). Several children might remind the group of a promise made earlier to change or modify previously used rules to decrease the possibility of arguments (Part IV), and several others will express their feelings concerning the benefits of playing a vigorous versus a nonvigorous game (Part V). The children will likely state several viewpoints before engaging in the decided upon activity. The values inherent in this type of childhood gathering provide essential opportunities for positive peer interactions and the sharing of ideas.

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