Publishing and Readership in Revolutionary France and America: A Symposium at the Library of Congress

Publishing and Readership in Revolutionary France and America: A Symposium at the Library of Congress

Publishing and Readership in Revolutionary France and America: A Symposium at the Library of Congress

Publishing and Readership in Revolutionary France and America: A Symposium at the Library of Congress

Synopsis

This volume presents a comparative framework in which to study the history of publishing and readership in Europe and North America during the eighteenth century. The chapters are grouped in four broad sections devoted to publishing as a profession, publishing and the law, readership, and the collection and use of materials. Chapters in each section are written by leading French and American specialists in this field. The chapter authors address their topics from the perspectives of social, economic, and cultural history; literary criticism; law; and library history. This comparative approach yields new insights into the political cultures of eighteenth-century France and America and into the relationship of print media and political culture.

Excerpt

The Library of Congress established its Center for the Book in 1977 to stimulate public interest in books, reading, and libraries and to encourage the study of books and print culture. the Center is a catalyst for promoting and exploring the vital role of books, reading, and libraries--nationally and internationally. As a partnership between the government and the private sector, the Center for the Book depends on tax-deductible contributions from individuals and corporations to support its program.

The success of the symposium and the publishing of these proceedings has also depended on a number of people. We would like first to recognize the generous support of the Embassy of France and the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs in providing assistance to assure the participation of French scholars. We would like to recognize, in particular, His Excellency the former Emmanuel de Margerie, then ambassador of France to the United States, and Jean-Pierre Angrémy, then head of Technical, Scientific, and Cultural Relations of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, currently French Ambassador to unesco.

Historians of France in the greater Washington area, a constant source of reliable support for any number of French projects at the Library of Congress, were especially helpful during the very busy bicentennial year. We would like to recognize in particular Jack Censer, Robert Forster, Sandra Horvath-Peterson, Emmet Kennedy, and Donald M. G. Sutherland. the American Antiquarian Society, especially Marcus McCorison and John Hench, were also, as usual, invaluable and generous with their support.

Finally, among our many colleagues at the Library of Congress who assisted in numerous ways, we would like to recognize the register of copyrights, Ralph Oman, and, also of the Copyright Office, Lewis Flacks, both for their participation and helpful suggestions. As well, we wish to note with appreciation Anne Boni of the Center for the Book for helping to organize the conference; Janie Ricks, of the European Division, for extensive and reliable . . .

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