Ethical Decision Making in Everyday Work Situations

Ethical Decision Making in Everyday Work Situations

Ethical Decision Making in Everyday Work Situations

Ethical Decision Making in Everyday Work Situations

Synopsis

This book takes a new approach to ethics by focusing on the kinds of dilemmas that confront people almost daily on the job. Guy presents the ten core values that surround ethical dilemmas, demonstrating the way in that personnel can sensitize themselves to the values involved in a problem and reach a solution which maximizes the important values. The author's unique contribution is to meld philosophy with everyday decision-making, offering the reader a common sense approach to making ethical decisions. Real-life case examples illustrate ethical dilemmas that involve personnel practices, organizing strategies, reporting functions, supervisory practices, whistleblowing, and more.

Excerpt

Making ethical decisions is easier said than done. Few people intentionally set out to be unethical. Yet often day-to-day activities lead people to succumb to expedient decisions which have less than ethical consequences. Many practical pressures make it difficult to perceive or adequately consider the ethical implications of conduct. By necessity, competent, successful managers must plant their feet firmly in the practical world of compromise and expediency. This book is written to help managers learn to practice, as well as to promote, ethical and expedient decision making in their work.

The 1980s brought to light an egregious disregard for ethics at the highest levels of government and business. In the wake of the arms- for-hostages deal between the United States and Iran, scandals within the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, procurement deals between arms manufacturers and the Pentagon, insider trading on Wall Street, the forced resignation of House Speaker Jim Wright, and a plethora of leveraged buyouts, comes a renewed emphasis on the need to be sensitive to ethical concerns.

Although there are many conflict-of-interest laws, corporate policy statements, and administrative regulations that direct choices in the workplace, these are only briefly alluded to in this book. Imis is because laws, policies, regulations, and other forms of rules are external controls and, being so, it is fairly easy to make personnel aware of them. This . . .

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